Search

Lost in the French Countryside

Introduction

Picture


Picture

Today we woke at 0730-ish and headed out for the Louvre.  Before doing that though, we stopped at a little bakery next to our hotel.  Joe bought a croissant and Andrew got an eclair.  The very cool thing about this eclair was the fact that it not only had a chocolate frosting but it was FILLED with chocolate as well!  I was surprised to see it gush with this velvety dark “mother load” of chocolatey goodness…mmmmm…that’s part of what makes Paris so memorable.  After we left the bakery, it was a quick hop on the metro to the Louvre.  We were surprised it was such a quick walk into the museum after having spent 15 minutes on a line into the Eiffel tower just to move 5 feet, literally–with only about 500 feet to go from there.  We quit the quest, but used the trip as an opportunity to encourage Andrew to navigate his way through the Metro.  He was able to get us from Montparnasse to Vavin so we could be that much closer to the hotel when we “sortied” out of the train station.Andrew took charge and seemed to enjoy the challenge which was noteworthy considering I thought he had found the metro somewhat intimidating, especially at the beginning.Oh, I almost forgot, when we got to the Eiffel tower last night, we were greeted by an explosion of lights that danced all over the tower itself.  We felt like it was “turned on” just for us.  I had no idea this happened nightly on the hour, and just as well.  It was so much cooler to believe it was a “sign” that we should be there at just the moment we arrived!

But as usual, I digress.  Back to the Louvre.

What can I say about this place that hasn’t already been said—and one hundred times more eloquently?  The idea that all of these works of art are maintained in this huge expanse of salons, cubbies, and floors of mazes is mentally daunting.  I was transfixed by the patience and pinpoint accuracy required to carve little-bitty eyes between 1-2 millimeters in media like wood, ivory, clay, rock—you name it.  I mean, what kind of utensils—and visual acuity no less, is required to do something like that?  But it was all there from the smallest earlobe to the most colossal statues and paintings.  A testament to man’s creativity and his hunger for artistic expression no matter how far back in time.  We saw art objects from at least as early as 5,000 BC.  Joe effortlessly maneuvered us through the various floors and exhibitions while Andrew and I followed and then drifted off in our own worlds of curiosity, exploration, and finally abject exhaustion.  Toward the end, we were like two zombies following aimlessly with only one aim—to sit down for more than the little 10 minute respites we allowed ourselves between museum exhibit jaunts.

So we got back to the hotel and allowed ourselves to be total “sloths” for the evening.  We have probably walked more in these three days than we have in the past three months and we are projected to walk that much more tomorrow when we tour Versailles.

Another noteworthy part of this trip has to do with the food.  We have been open to different dining experiences including one very hefty portion of steak tartare enjoyed by Andrew last night.  I was so afraid we would have to rush him to hospital after this double-fisted size portion of rare ground beef.  But luckily he has felt just fine, and is now open to various other gastronomic oddities like pate, escargot and every variety of lamb the chefs in Paris can cook up.  The Dijon mustard here is another great find.  It has a kick similar to Wasabi but with a mustard flavor that makes every type of food from bread to chicken taste like it was made to be slathered with this tear-producing, sinus clearing concoction. I purposely bought a jar of it just to keep in the room, and my mouth is actually watering as I write these words.  At this very moment, I am actively stifling a desire to search out the nearest restaurant just to get some type of baguette to dip into this golden foodie version of the alcohol shot.


Picture

26 March
Dieppe
Coastal town on the western shore of France, found a one bedroom chambre owned by a sailing instructor and his wife a choreographer. House built in the 70s but property very old rock walls, etc

Picture

28 March
Drove through the port of Normandy at the mouth of the Seine. Stopped at the town of Hon Fleurs, located on the south shore of the seine, nice sailing community, Drove toward mon st Michele and stopped in little village of Servon and checked into the ??? Auberge,

Picture

30 March
Mon St Michele
Leisurely walk through one of the UNESCO world heritage sites. Beautiful view and wonderful company.
Chateau de Bonanon
cruising down a country in the Britagne region of France
Pass a sign for a hotel, decided to check it out, wow, it was a castle estate converted to a top notch 185€ per room inn. After checking out the available rooms we decided to spend a little extra money and stay the night,